Energy Management

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We provide safe, sustainable, cost-effective heating and cooling services. We supply steam to buildings. Operate and maintain heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Operate and maintain generators. We purchase fuels and electricity while maintaining cost control. And we conserve energy.

Steam Service

The Central Heating Plant generates and delivers steam to each main campus building for space heating, cooking, and domestic hot water.

  • Total steam capacity: 130,000 lbs. per hour at 80 psig
  • Fuel: natural gas with fuel oil backup

HVAC Systems Control

The Central Energy Plant Control Room monitors and controls heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in all campus buildings. Operators:

  • Set occupied and unoccupied schedules for classrooms, offices, and labs
  • Start and stop ventilation equipment
  • Monitor and troubleshoot alarms
  • Maximize occupant comfort and system efficiency

Campus Generators

The Central Energy Plant maintains and operates four generators, with a total generating capacity of 9.0 MW at 12,470 volts.

  • Caterpillar 3516B 69.0 liter V-16 diesel engines, 2,250 kW output each
  • Engines are capable of operating on biodiesel
  • Can restore power to the entire campus within two minutes in an emergency

Monitor and Control Utility Costs

We prepare budgets and cost estimates for water, electricity, and natural gas, monitor energy and water use in each building and:

  • Monitor and intervene in utility rate cases
  • Purchase electricity and natural gas
  • Manage energy-saving projects

Energy Conservation

Heat generated by the compressors that freeze the Student Development Complex ice rink warm the swimming pool. Hot air from residence hall laundries is recovered to keep residents warm.  Thermal energy delivered to the Great Lakes Research Center from the Central Heating Plant's exhaust. Learn more about campus energy use at Michigan Tech, recycling and other green initiatives, and what the University is doing to reduce its carbon footprint. Visit the Sustainable Futures Institute at Michigan Tech to learn more.

50%

campus electricity from renewable wind power